Events

At JSAAHC, 2013

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Bob Gibson

Last Word with Bob Gibson

Before coming to the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership at UVA as executive director in March of 2008, Bob Gibson was a political writer, columnist and editor at the Charlottesville Daily Progress for 30 years, where he specialized in covering local, state, and national politics. He is the winner of several Virginia Press Association awards, the 1993 Virginia Bar Association Award in the Field of Law and Justice and the 1993 Southern Journalism Award for investigative reporting about racial disparities in sentencing. He is also familiar to many Virginians as a guest on public radio WAMU’s Kojo Nnamdi Show in Washington and as a host of Evening Edition and Assembly Conversations on public radio WVTF and Radio IQ.

He is married to Sarah McConnell, who hosts the public radio program “With Good Reason” from the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and they have three daughters: Helen, Logan and Stella. He grew up in Arlington, VA, and has a long personal interest in Virginia’s politics and government. He is a 1972 graduate of the University of Virginia with a major in government and foreign affairs. He is currently a graduate student in education at UVA.

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Draw-a-thon

An Open Call to Artists

Friday, January 18, 2012  | 6-10 pm

Saturday, January 19, 2012 | 11-7 pm

Jefferson School Auditorium

To mark its opening, the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center will hold a 12-hour DRAW-A-THON on January 18, from 6-10 pm, and January 19, from11-7 pm. Twenty-four African American models will pose for artists and an audience for 30 minute intervals. Easels, charcoal and paper will be provided or the artist may bring the materials needed for his/her own medium. Artists are asked to sign up for 1 hour intervals so that the DRAW-A-THON is a continuous event.

The event underscores two elements of looking, the passing glance and the elongated gaze. Because it occurs in the midst of the City Center’s open house and will be streamed live on the Center’s ustream channel Heritage Center at the Edge, it engages with notions of spectacle and voyeurism, distanced regards that nonetheless suggest some level of interest in the subject. It further calls attention to the complex and layered nature of Black identity in the most immediate way–by recording through art the many types of faces that comprise the black community. Participants are asked to consider their understanding of Blackness from an insider and outsider point of view.

If interested in modeling contact Anthony Amos at doublea1k@gmail.com.

Want to reserve your easel contact Elizabeth Breeden at brs@cstone.net.

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Hiphopistan

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Living the Hip Life

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Follow Your Heart

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I Want My Name Back

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Local Hip Hop

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Deborah Willis

Global Hip Hop

Monday, October 7 – Friday October 11, 2013

Auditorium, African American Heritage Center

Continuing our quest to define the transformations in black music, the five films that make up this series reveal the transformation of Hip Hop. They point to the fact that the genre has the power to transcend racial and cultural boundaries.

Global Hip Hop is made possible through the generous support of the Blue Moon Foundation and Hampton Inn and Suites.

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Hiphopistan: Representing Locality in a Global City

Çiğdem Akbay
2007, 25 minutes, Color, Turkey

A documentary film that examines the impact of hip-hop culture on Istanbul youth and reveals how young Turkish rappers, DJs, break-dancers, and graffiti artists creatively blend popular influences with their local cultural values and traditions.

Showtime October 7, 5:30 pm, suggested donation $3.00

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Living the Hip Life

Jesse W. Shipley
2007, 61 minutes Color, US/Ghana

This film is a musical portrait of street life in urban West Africa. It follows the birth of Hiplife music in Accra, Ghana, a mix of various African musical forms and American hip hop. Archival footage and hip hop music videos are remixed with interviews and the daily lives of rap artists. We follow Reggie Rockstone, the Godfather of Hiplife in the founding of the musical movement, as well as the Mobile Boys a group of aspiring rap artists as they try to make it in the music business. With humor and personality these characters move across the political and musical landscape of urban Ghana.

Showtime October 7, 6:30 pm, suggested donation $5.00

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Follow Your Heart: China’s New Youth Movement

Duncan Jepson
2007, 89 minutes, China, Mandarin/English subtitles

A revealing documentary on the work and life of successful and independent Chinese Hip-Hop artists and their cultural influence in a society rapidly changing from communism to consumerism. Clashing with both traditional Chinese values and new modern ones, these artists believe that Hip-Hop allows for the expression of freedom and being true to oneself. Furthermore, the film describes the high optimism and convictions of this new generation that will inherit a political and economic superpower.

Showtime: October 8, 2013 6:00 pm, suggested donation $8.00

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Blaze: The Truth About Hip Hop

Maurice Lynch
2006, 90 minutes English

In Blaze, the interviewees elaborate on the importance of a Christian message in their music and the vast difference between this approach and that of their more commercial associates. This documentary provides a window to an interesting world into which many would not ordinarily have access.

Showtime TBA, suggested donation $8.00

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I Want My Name Back

Roger Paradisio
2011, 85 minutes, English

Film followed by discussion with producer Josh Green.

Highlighting the rise, fall and rise again of original members of The Sugarhill Gang, Wonder Mike (Michael Wright) and Master Gee (Guy O’Brien). The Sugarhill Gang recorded the first-ever platinum rap album and rap song and are credited with introducing hip hop to the world more than thirty years ago. We follow The Sugarhill Gang through its chance beginnings in New Jersey, its rise to fame, and the subsequent struggles of the real Wonder Mike and Master Gee as they try to create new music and battle with their label and an indifferent legal system which stripped them of their identities and rightful legacies.

Showtime 5:30 pm, suggested donation $8.00

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Local Hip Hop

Hip Hop for President

Local artists Anthony Amos and Bernard Hankins discuss their web-based sitcom Hip Hop for President and describe the hip hop scene in Charlottesville. A performance by Spit it Out and Freak Aliaz follows the discussion.

Showtime October 11, 5:30 pm, suggested donation $8.00

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Scott French

"A Dream of the Future":

What Can We Learn from Jefferson School's
Founding Generations in the 21st Century?

March 19 | 6 pm

Jefferson School Auditorium
Scott A. French, Ph.D
Associate Professor
University of Central Florida

Historian and exhibit curator Scot French will discuss the history, memory, and living legacies of Jefferson School’s founding generations and share insights/excerpts from his catalog essay, “African American Civic Activism and the Making of Jefferson High School, 1865-1926.”

Dr. French is Associate Professor of History at the University of Central Florida. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia’s Corcoran Department of History in 2000 and served as Assistant/Associate Director of U.Va.’s Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies from 1997-2006. He is the author of The Rebellious Slave: Nat Turner in American Memory (Houghton Mifflin, 2004) and co-author, with Craig Barton and Peter Flora, of Booker T. Washington Elementary School and Segregated Education in Virginia (2007). The short film he produced on Charlottesville’s Vinegar Hill neighborhood, That World is Gone: Race and Displacement in a Southern Town, won audience favorite for Best Short Documentary at the 2010 Virginia Film Festival.

Virginia Festival of the Book Events

at JSAAHC

Poetry

Natasha Trethewey, U.S. Poet laureate

Saturday, March 23, 2013 | 2 pm

Featuring:

Kevin McFadden (moderator)

Natasha Trethewey

U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads from her latest collection, Thrall.

Sponsored by The Miller School Of Albemarle.

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African American Biographies

Americans Who Changed History

Saturday, March 23, 2013 | 12 pm

Featuring:

Valerie C. Cooper, Maria Stewart, The Bible & The Right of African Americans;

Wayne Dawkins, City Son: Andrew W. Cooper’s Impact on Modern-Day Brooklyn;

Anne S. Pruitt-Logan, Faithful to the Task at Hand: The Life of Lucy Diggs Slowe

Tamyra Turner (moderator)

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Race, Murder, and Mayhem in America

Saturday, March 23, 2013 | 10 am

Featuring:

Sharon Davies, Rising Road: A True Tale of Love, Race and Religion in America;
Jefferson Morley, Snow-Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key, and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835;

Susan Tejada, In Search of Sacco and Vanzetti;

Abigail Turner (moderator)

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Our Future

One Planet, Tangled in Technology,
with Liberty and Justice for Whom?

Thursday, March 21, 2013 | 7 pm

RSVP required

Featuring:

Rosalyn W. Berne, Waiting in the Silence

Kathryn Neeley (moderator)

Rosalyn Berne examines how emerging technologies change who we are as human beings and how we redesign ourselves.

Hosted by U.Va. Office of Engagement, Engaging the Mind Program.

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John Hunter

John Hunter

World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements

Monday, April 22, 2013 | 5:30 pm

A native Virginian and graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, John Hunter is an award-winning gifted teacher and educational consultant who has dedicated his life to helping children realize their full potential. Employing his background as a musician composer and filmmaker during a three-decade career as a teacher, Hunter has combined his gifted teaching and artistic talents to develop unique teaching programs using multimedia software programs in creative writing and film courses.

During his university years, he traveled and studied comparative religions and philosophy throughout Japan, India and China. It was while in India, the cradle of Ghandian thought, Hunter, intrigued by the principles of non-violence, began to think of how his profession might contribute to peace in the world.

Knowing that ignoring violence would not make it go away, how could he teach peace in an often-violent world? Accepting the reality of violence, he would seek to incorporate ways to explore harmony in various situations. This exploration would take form in the framework of a game—something that students would enjoy. Within the game data space, they would be challenged, while enhancing collaborative and communication skills.

In 1978, at the Richmond Community High School, Hunter led the first sessions of his World Peace Game. Over time, in a synchronous unfolding with the growing global focus on increasingly complex social and political conditions, the game has gained new impetus. As Hunter succinctly explains, “The World Peace Game is about learning to live and work comfortably in the unknown.”

This lecture is free and open to the public. It is made possible through the generous support of albemarle magazine and the Blue Moon Fund. Image courtesy of Theresa White.

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Illusions

A film by Julie Dash
1983, 34 minutes

Friday, July 12 | 6-6:30 pm, 7-7:30 pm

Saturday, July 13 | 6-6:30 pm, 7-7:30 pm

Auditorium, Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Suggested donation $5

The time is 1942, a year after Pearl Harbor; the place is National Studios, a fictitious Hollywood motion picture studio. Mignon Duprée, a Black woman studio executive who appears to be white and Ester Jeeter, an African American woman who is the singing voice for a white Hollywood star are forced to come to grips with a society that perpetuates false images as status quo. This highly-acclaimed drama by one of the leading African American women directors follows Mignon’s dilemma, Ester’s struggle and the use of cinema in wartime Hollywood: three illusions in conflict with reality.

The film is shown in conjunction with Lola Flash|[sur]passing. A suggested $5 donation will be collected at the door. All proceeds go to

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Mapping the Jefferson School

Saturday, July 13 | 10 am – 3 pm

In recognition of Nelson Mandela International Day and to mark his 95th birthday, we will hold our first Freedom Read-athon. Twelve hours of words for freedom–67 minutes of which will be devoted to words by Nelson Mandela. We invite all who believe in freedom to step up to the mic!

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Chihamba 24th Annual African American Cultural Arts Festival presents

African Attire Fashion Show and Health Update

Friday July 26, 2013 | 6:30-8:30 pm

Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Auditorium

This event is sold out.

Sponsored by the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center and Martha Jefferson Starr Hill Center. This event is for women only. Wear African attire and get a special gift.

It is a free event however, a ticket is necessary. Tickets are available at the African American Heritage Center or at the Martha Jefferson Starr Hill Health Center, both at the historic Jefferson School City Center 233 4th St, NW 2nd floor.

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Economic Stress—Empowerment for a Harsh Truth

An Evening with Dr. Robert Brown
Lecture and Book signing

Thursday, November 21, 2013 | 6 pm-8 pm

Reception to follow lecture and book signing
Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Auditorium

In his book Economic Stress—Empowerment for a Harsh Truth, Robert Brown, medical sociologist and adjunct professor at Howard University, captures the personal stories of people ranging from seasoned professionals to single moms who, for one reason or another, are unable to meet their financial obligations. Through these anecdotes he poses the question of whether or not it is it time to redefine what success and the American Dream mean in the 21st century.

In his discussion he will share these stories along with strategies to manage economic stress. For a local perspective, Dr. Brown will be joined by Eboni Bugg, Outreach Coordinator for the Women’s Initiative.

This event is made possible through the generous support of Wisdom Oak Winery.